Dell U2413 Monitor turning off hardware fix

I think Dell make a great monitor; I’ve been buying Dell 24” monitors ever since the brilliant 16:10 aspect 2407wfp. However, the more recent Dell U2413 appears to have a rather serious issue where it will turn off after extended use. Seemingly the monitor runs hot and enters standby as a measure of thermal protection.

ifixit.com to the rescue!

The people over at ifxit.com did some great investigation into why.   People far more knowledgeable about electronics and printed circuit board issues than I discovered the root cause of the issue and offered several fixes.

  1. Add two resistors into a circuit to lower the thyristor voltage (and thus raise the cut off temperature)
  2. Replace the thyristors with improved components that have a higher thermal ceiling.
  3. Add head sinks to thermal components to aid cooling.

I went for option 1 and wanted to offer slightly more beginner level instructions than on the ifixit.com site.  I encourage you to explore the options over at ifixit.com suitable to your needs.

Resistor to buy?

  • 1K ohm
  • Surface mount
  • 0805 size

I got the 0805 as recommended by the ifixit.com thread, but I see no reason why a 1206 wouldn’t work as well and be slightly easier to solder onto the board if you have difficulty with the small size.

Step-by-Step

1. Remove the monitor from the stand.  Place on a chair, screen out.

2. Remove the black FRONT bezel, not the rear cover!

(if you remove the rear cover you cannot access the power and control board and the monitor is supported by the rear cover.  The retaining clips are easy to break, see end photo)

3. Use a plastic spatula or pick to prise into the bezel, it has a deep lip to get past.  I found this easier on a chair than with the monitor flat on a table.

Use a pick to pry front screen bezel away

4. With the bezel fully removed, using a towel to protect the screen place the monitor face down on a stable surface and remove the side case and the rear panel.

5. This allows the case retaining clips that hold the port selection and power unit to release.

metal ports and rear cover free

6. Carefully lift the metal shield and unstick the black ribbon cable from the back of the LCD.  Depress the clips (they only move slightly) and remove the cable from the port on the LCD.

Carefully remove LCD ribbon cable

7. Pivot the metal shield being careful not to stress the remaining ribbon cables still attached. The whole assembly should lie flat and allow access to the rear of the PCB.

8. Place your resistor onto the locations at Q971 and Q972. The pin furthest from the text in each case.

Q971 & Q972 locations

9. Mark the limit of the resistor with a pen and carefully remove some of the green insulating surface covering to expose the copper ground layer.

Insulating surface removed to expose ground layer

10. Carefully solder the resistor to the pin at one end and the ground location at the other.

0805 resistor soldered to the board

That’s it!
Even with my very armature soldering skills it’s achievable because the components are small you need very little heat and solder to make a connection. It may be advisable to have a helper hold the resistor still with some needle tweezers.

Re-assemble the monitor by reattaching the ribbon cable to the LCD and press the screen front bezel back in place.

After a full 24 hours of looping movies with the screen on it seems that the fix is good (as also confirmed by others on the ifixit.com site)

Hopefully you have less broken clips than I did!

leftover broken clips!

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